Search found 54 matches

by James
Mon Apr 09, 2012 3:51 pm
Forum: Prototype Locomotive & Rolling Stock
Topic: South Pacific Coast Locomotive classes
Replies: 3
Views: 2481

Re: South Pacific Coast Locomotive classes

Confusingly, the SPC 8-22C's were built to a different plan than the C&C locomotives. The SPC engines were a couple tons heavier. The 8-20C was a fairly rare class during the 70's and 80's. Not many narrow gauge lines used the intermediate weight rails the class was sized for. Physically it was only...
by James
Mon Apr 09, 2012 3:30 pm
Forum: Prototype Locomotive & Rolling Stock
Topic: South Pacific Coast Locomotive classes
Replies: 3
Views: 2481

Re: South Pacific Coast Locomotive classes

SPC 1 was an 8-14C drawing 1. cylinders 10x16, 42 inch drivers. It would have looked very much like this locomotive google image found me here: http://www.ironhorse129.com/projects/engines/NPC_9/Images/Baldwin_18-4C.jpg Note that the above is incorrectly mis-labeled as an 8-18C; rest assured it's an...
by James
Mon Apr 09, 2012 1:11 am
Forum: Prototype Locomotive & Rolling Stock
Topic: Pacific Coast Railway #6
Replies: 4
Views: 2816

Re: Pacific Coast Railway #6

As the above poster mentions, the 12x16 4-4-0 is effectively a clone of "Eureka", except with different ornamentation. It would have looked fancy in black. Just in case it's desired, the basic specs for the SLO&SMV 2-4-2T "Avila" are as follows: boiler: 32 inch diameter, tubes are 97.375 length fire...
by James
Fri Jan 13, 2012 2:37 pm
Forum: Prototype Locomotive & Rolling Stock
Topic: NC #2 on the ground at Reese River Bridge
Replies: 4
Views: 2524

Re: NC #2 on the ground at Reese River Bridge

"Here is another photo of a NC train in the default position." Har har! I imagine the N.C. crews were well-trained in re-railing technique. The quantity of photos seem to suggest that 2-6-0 #2 was something of a favored locomotive on that line. I wonder how the 4-4-0's fared on that railroad. That a...
by James
Wed Dec 07, 2011 9:05 pm
Forum: Prototype Locomotive & Rolling Stock
Topic: Russian Iron supplement
Replies: 2
Views: 1998

Re: Russian Iron supplement

"The Norris 4-6-0 lithograph I have at home has a proper shade for the jacket as well, though it is much closer to the "medium grey" shade of the metal itself." That makes a lot of sense and coincides with what other sources report about Russian Iron. There was none of what we today call "quality co...
by James
Tue Dec 06, 2011 8:14 pm
Forum: Western Narrow Gauge Discussion
Topic: North Pacific Coast RR--White's Hill (question)
Replies: 7
Views: 3812

Re: North Pacific Coast RR--White's Hill (question)

Thanks, Randy, for reminding me of the Fleming publication. I can't believe I forgot that; I've read it many times. While not as specific as I'd like, it does give an idea of the grade as well as confirming that the line was apparently not compensated for curves on grades (if Fleming is accurate--I ...
by James
Tue Dec 06, 2011 7:54 pm
Forum: Prototype Locomotive & Rolling Stock
Topic: Russian Iron supplement
Replies: 2
Views: 1998

Russian Iron supplement

In addition to the Baldwin specification books, Southern Methodist University, Central University Libraries, DeGolyer Library has a collection of drawings from William Halsey. William Halsey Collection These drawings date to the period in question, 1860's or 1870's Many of the readers here will have...
by James
Thu Nov 17, 2011 12:22 pm
Forum: Model Railroading
Topic: SPC Locomotive Fuel
Replies: 7
Views: 3683

Re: SPC Locomotive Fuel

One advantage of the "Stevens stack" the SPC adopted was that it worked acceptably well with both wood and coal. Diamond stacks weren't entirely satisfactory as spark arrestors for wood fuel, while the Radley&Hunter stack reduced draft more than was desirable for coal. The SPC later added extended s...
by James
Thu Nov 17, 2011 9:28 am
Forum: Western Narrow Gauge Discussion
Topic: North Pacific Coast RR--White's Hill (question)
Replies: 7
Views: 3812

North Pacific Coast RR--White's Hill (question)

What is the steepest grade on the White's Hill portion of the old, pre-realignment North Pacific Coast route? Also, what's the maximum curvature occurring on the steepest grade? I don't know offhand whether the NPC compensated its grades for curves. What was the length of the climb? My local library...
by James
Thu Nov 17, 2011 9:06 am
Forum: Prototype Locomotive & Rolling Stock
Topic: NCNG #5 photo.
Replies: 6
Views: 2967

Re: NCNG #5 photo.

"One confusing aspect of measuring locomotive power was that it wasn't done by horsepower. It was measured by tractive effort. That is, how many pounds of drawbar (coupler) pull the engine had...how much dead weight it could pull. NCNG # 8 had 16,000 lbs of tractive effort Not much, compared to a SP...