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Virginiated and Truckified part 2- The INYO.

Known as the "Silver Queen of the shortlines", The Virginia & Truckee Railroad operated their own narrow gauge subsidiary: the Carson and Colorado. Additionally the railroad and its officers would be an influence to many narrow gauge and shortline railroads throughout Nevada and California.

Virginiated and Truckified part 2- The INYO.

Postby John Coker » Mon Mar 11, 2013 8:35 pm

This shows this beautiful locomotive in Virginia about 1886. A commission from California. It was posted on FB first.
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Re: Virginiated and Truckified part 2- The INYO.

Postby James » Tue Mar 12, 2013 8:37 am

Records show that the 22, as with the other V&T Baldwins, was originally painted red. When did the V&T transition to CPRR-inspired brown? I actually like the brown better because it also did away with the natural wood finish cab--a style I've never cared for.

I've always liked the V&T 4-4-0's. The proportions suit my sense of aesthetics.
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Re: Virginiated and Truckified part 2- The INYO.

Postby Andrew Brandon » Tue Mar 12, 2013 11:28 am

James,

No V&T locomotive was ever a proper "red" as far as the evidence tells us. "Inyo" was delivered Lake and Gold, Style 1 from Baldwin, as was the J.W. Bowker. "Reno" and "Genoa" and earlier Baldwins were delivered in Wine which is a dark burgundy color. Our header image here on the site is close to Wine, though a bit too red. If you look at this post: Baldwin Paint Research Thread, Randolph Ruiz posted a photo of the original Baldwin Wine color that was located on the "Glenbrook".

The V&Ts brown scheme mimics CP practice and begins in the 1880s. "Dayton" and "Columbus" being CP locomotives were painted in a variation of the CP paint scheme owing to them having been built in Sacramento. The V&T reused the brown and red wheels (for passenger locos) but added their own version of Style 1 striping. As time went on, they simplified the striping, eventually removing it all together. Today, the "Dayton" wears the earlier scheme with the Style 1-esq striping and the "Inyo" wears the later from around 1895. Freight locomotives of the period would have had brown wheels instead of red until about the 1890s when it is believed they switched from brown to black overall. The passenger locos most likely stayed brown with red wheels until 1902 when they were all rebuilt and painted black, "Genoa" is restored to that scheme in CSRM.

The "red" schemes are almost always inventions from hollywood, artists or early hobbyists trying to interpret old color from photographs. One of my favorite examples of this is Howard Fogg's colorful painting of V&T 25. The scheme he painted is based on a scheme used for a film.
Another scheme that is often associated with model railroaders is a solid "fire engine red" scheme with a black panel on the tender (I couldn't find an image). This scheme is not only hideous, but is a complete misunderstanding of the chemical registers of old photographs and poor research.
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Re: Virginiated and Truckified part 2- The INYO.

Postby James » Tue Mar 12, 2013 3:21 pm

I did mean the dark red-brown/wine color by "red;" I guess I was overly vague. I'm all too aware that bright red amounts to fantasy colors except for vermillion wheels (and even those were by no means universal). Thanks for clarifying what I did not since some other reader might mistake my vague terminology for something I didn't intend. Halting such misconceptions is one of the purposes and best features of this site. Fire engine red annoys me and robin egg blue boilers, even more so.

The builder's sheet for 22 lists it as wine color and specifically notes that the general finish is basically a copy of Genoa. Lake doesn't appear until about three months later on the builder's sheets. Was 22 actually delivered in the newer color?

The Central Pacific (and by extension, railroads influenced by it) seemed to like vermillion wheels; it seemed to hang onto them a bit longer than elsewhere. For the most part that trend seems to have been in decline by the mid 70's.

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Interestingly, not *all* hollywood artists seem to have been inept. Watching a colorized version of "Red River" the other day I noticed the locomotive (The INYO, I believe) was colored mostly green in a style reminiscent of the well-known lithograph of the Mason locomotive "Highland Light."
Last edited by James on Tue Mar 12, 2013 5:21 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Virginiated and Truckified part 2- The INYO.

Postby Andrew Brandon » Tue Mar 12, 2013 4:26 pm

Once upon a time, I almost made a little tagline on the site header that said something akin to: "Where Red locomotives and blue boiler jackets come to die." As much as I love the V&T, I am always out to make sure the red vanishes. Jim Wilke did an excellent talk on the early V&T schemes at the V&TRRHS Conference last year. I need to see if we can get his permission to put the slideshow on the site. His presentation opened a lot of eyes, I have hope that the fire engine red myth will die out eventually.

Thanks for the correction, you are right, Inyo was "Wine". I got the color mixed up, that will teach me to write out lengthy descriptions without my reference materials... ;)

When I return home this evening I will see if I can find a date for the introduction of brown on the V&T.
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Re: Virginiated and Truckified part 2- The INYO.

Postby John Coker » Tue Mar 12, 2013 5:09 pm

I discussed the paint issue with Mal Ferrell before painting it. He believed the paint job that NSRM applied on #22 was introduced in the mid--1880s. The photo I used for the matrix was taken in 1886. I based the paint scheme on the NSRM restoration.
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