PacificNG Header
PacificNG Header 

NPC/SPC cars in San Francisco -- 1875 - 1909

North American Narrow Gauge; West of the Rockies (including Canada; Mexico).

NPC/SPC cars in San Francisco -- 1875 - 1909

Postby Dave » Mon Oct 19, 2015 4:32 pm

Two narrow gauge railroads floated freight cars to San Francisco: The North Pacific Coast and the South Pacific Coast. The float operations had a long life, starting in 1875 and running until at least 1909, and were a big part of the business for the narrow gauge lines. Yet very little has been published on this topic. I’ve studied the San Francisco waterfront narrow gauge history over the last 8 years and I’d like to share a chronological outline of the narrow gauge operations there for those interested in the NPC and SPC.

1) The shoreline of SF began to be modified and expanded through filling right after the start of the Gold Rush. Looking at pictures and maps it can be seen to have been a fairly piecemeal process that resulted in a very jagged waterfront. By the 1860s this process was seen to require a proper plan and control was given to the State Harbor Commission who were responsible for the construction and development of the wharves, formal seawall and a portion of the land behind it. As early as 1872 they were considering a railroad along the wharves, but the non-linear nature of the waterfront and the slopes of Telegraph hill, made this near impossible to engineer at the time. Starting in 1879 proper seawall construction was underway from the Ferry House moving north that took nearly two decades to complete. By the mid-1880s the work opened up enough new land in North Beach that a railroad along the docks was possible. But before that could happen the NPC and SPC were already floating cars to the City.

2) In early 1875 the new NPC began to float freight cars on barges from Sausalito. They did not have a slip to offload the cars themselves from the barges; instead I believe they may have unloaded cars while still on the barges and carried freight ashore by hand and crane. The NPC was assigned different wharves over the next 15 years and by 1889 were landing at Clay Street wharf.

3) In 1880-81 the SPC began to float freight and a freight house and slip was built immediately south of the Ferry House. There were likely two tracks and cars may have been offloaded by horse, though there is no evidence of this yet. Of all the early pictures of the Ferry House I’ve seen only one shows the freight house in the distance—but no track or cars.

4) In 1888 talks began seriously on a rail operation on the waterfront, fed by ferries. This idea was approved in 1890 and in 1891 the Harbor Commission built the State Harbor Belt Railroad. The line as built ran along East Street (present day Embarcadero) from Vallejo Street just north of the Ferry House, north to Francisco Street. A transfer yard was constructed on the blocks bounded by Vallejo, Front, Union and East—for use by the SF&NP and the SPC, the two lines using the rail facility from the start. The Belt railroad had a single ferry slip at Lombard street, which faced east into the Bay. All the railroads using it were forced to alter their ships to the apron design. An engine house was built at Lombard off of East Street to house the 2-4-2 standard gauge #1, the “Gov. Markham.” The line, except for the engine house track, was three-rail. There were no private or industrial spurs. At the start the engines actually wandered down the ferry apron to pull cars from the boats. Complaints and a suggestion they get an idler car after damages occurred led to two flatcars being purchased.

5) In 1892 the line was extended about a half mile north to Powell and East Streets to reach the extensive lumber yards in the area (Simpson, DH Bibb, Bellingham Bay). A second ferry slip was put in. At this time the NPC was operating on the line and a 4-track yard was set up for them at Lombard Street. A picture can be seen in Bruce MacGregor’s “Birth of California Narrow Gauge” on page 239.

6) From the start the line was successful. During the first nine years it survived with one loco, serviced by the SF&NP or the SP when necessary, with leased locos from those lines during servicing times. Operations appear to have been to move specific railroad’s cars in blocks to and from ferries—when a ferry arrived or was scheduled to depart—at specific times on specific days of the week. Most operations were to move cars off the ferry to the yards but a lot of team activity happened outside the yards, with cars parked on East Street. As the area behind the seawall was filled in businesses began to fill in North Beach around Telegraph Hill and north. Some of these requested spurs but as far as I can tell these were denied prior to 1899.

7) Ship and rail traffic grew fast in 1898-1900 and the Harbor Commission made some important changes: A—The Lombard ferry slips were rebuilt to face northeast to reduce the impact on the wharves and allow more wharves to be built; B—The SP was granted a yard in the block bounded by Pacific, Vallejo, Davis and East, marking the start of true business with that railroad, this yard was not dual gauge; C—the AT&SF arrived in the East Bay and a yard was put in for their float traffic between Chestnut and Francisco Streets below Montgomery, this yard was not dual gauge; D—The Harbor Commission began to grant private spurs for shippers and within 5 years a dozen of these would branch off of East Street or along North Point Street becoming major revenue generators for the line. I don’t believe all private spurs were dual gauge but I have a mountain of information to sift through that may disprove this.

8) Traffic was booming after 1900. The SPC was shipping on average 500 cars a month to the City, and the NPC was shipping on average 200, with seasonal rises and drops but an overall continuing traffic increase from 1900 through 1904. The line purchased a second engine in 1901, a 2-4-2, and a third, identical, engine in 1904. An additional stall and extension to the engine house were constructed—the roundhouse seen today on the Embarcadero actually was built later. There is no evidence of narrow gauge engines running in regular revenue service on the line nor is there evidence yet of interchange occurring between the NPC/North Shore and SPC using the Belt as the connector.

9) The SPC pretty much was done shipping cars to SF in 1905 with the completion of standard gauging the line into the Santa Cruz mountains. A year later the North Shore would purchase 150 SPC cars to meet its then-increasing traffic.

10) The 1906 earthquake very briefly shut the Belt line but it was back in operation within a month, including North Shore shipments as that line was brought back into operation.

11) The North Shore/Northwest Pacific was winding down narrow gauge operations into SF and in 1909 began to offload all outbound narrow gauge cargos onto standard gauge cars in San Anselmo. Saucelito ceased being the freight shipping point for the line and Tiburon handled all freight to the City.

12) In 1909 the Harbor Belt and NWP were discussing the removal of 3-rail. When the actual last narrow gauge car ran on the Belt is unknown so far but it likely was in 1909-1910 when the Belt began an extensive upgrade of its track.

13) A piece of 3-rail track existed into the 1990s at Front street near Union. This was originally one of the SF&NP freight house tracks that was dual gauged in 1891. It likely survived because it was a track on the fringe of the operation that needed no upgrading. If it exists today, it is buried under a parking lot.
Dave
 
Posts: 16
Joined: Thu May 02, 2013 9:10 am

Re: NPC/SPC cars in San Francisco -- 1875 - 1909

Postby Loco112 » Sun Oct 25, 2015 12:39 am

Very thorough report on this rare, for 3' gauge, intermodal rails to ships deck facility.

Thanks for your great effort!
Create projects so fantastic they inspire others to undertake even greater projects.
Loco112
User avatar
Loco112
 
Posts: 77
Joined: Wed Nov 03, 2010 8:36 pm
Location: Dallas, Texas.

Re: NPC/SPC cars in San Francisco -- 1875 - 1909

Postby Andrew Brandon » Mon Oct 26, 2015 1:15 pm

Thank you Dave, this is great information.

The State Belt page is in dire need of an update, this will go a long way towards getting that done.
If you're interested in writing a short updated article on it, let me know.

Have you found any hard documentation that interchange didn't happen? I found a photo ages ago (that I cannot find at the moment) that appeared to show a boxcar with SPC herald near the NPC shops in Sausalito. It was out in the distance so it might just be a photo defect, but I'll see if I can track that down later today.
Andrew Brandon - PacificNG Webmaster
An End To Red Domes In Our Lifetime!
User avatar
Andrew Brandon
 
Posts: 569
Joined: Mon Aug 17, 2009 4:37 pm
Location: Grass Valley, Ca

Re: NPC/SPC cars in San Francisco -- 1875 - 1909

Postby Dave » Mon Oct 26, 2015 5:21 pm

Loco112 and Andrew, thanks for the kind words.

The Belt is such an unusual railroad in US narrow gauge history--not just being a near-unique 3-rail industrial district switcher but that it was only fed by water craft until 1910 serving 5 railroads (4 if you consider the SP and SP narrow gauge to be one entity at this time). It was a big, busy business that was very integral to SF's growth. There are many mysteries about the line but it's slowly giving up its secrets. My most recent work has exposed when most of the private spurs were put in and which were dual gauge--and in some cases which of the five lines shipped to them. Sometimes we have a record showing which railroads shipped to a spur to indicate if the SPC or NPC did, in one case all I have is that there were 2 frogs purchased for the switch, indicating narrow and standard gauge but not who. A lot of Belt history is like this, slowly building bits on what I already know.

I have not yet found any evidence in the Belt records of interchange between the NPC and SPC but if a photo proves otherwise please let me know! However, be cautious: The North Shore purchased SPC cars after the earthquake, 150 of them, so seeing an SPC logo in a North Shore or NWP photo is entirely believable and not indicate interchange; the key is to solidly date that photo and we can work from there. I think the important question isn't proving they didn't interchange, it's proving they DID. Anything else is conjecture at the moment. My current belief is that the narrow gauge traffic typically was focused on feeding SF businesses and the lumberyards and that cars came to the city full and went home empty the majority of the time.

I'd be happy to help update the map page. Be aware: The map shows the line at its 1900 extent, just prior to major track and ferry slip overhaul, two new yards and about a dozen private spurs put in from 1900-1906. I wonder if the line really needs multiple maps: Original 1891, expanded 1892, 1899, and 1905 at its narrow gauge maximum. Let me know how you'd like to communicate on this.

Dave Eggleston
Dave
 
Posts: 16
Joined: Thu May 02, 2013 9:10 am

Re: NPC/SPC cars in San Francisco -- 1875 - 1909

Postby r3feetr » Mon Oct 26, 2015 8:53 pm

There may not be any evidence for SPC/NPC interchange on the State Belt but it was the interchange of freight between the SPC/NPC that provided some of the justification for building the State Belt. The 1881 Report of the Board of Railroad Commissioners, pages 82-83, has a report on the need for a waterfront railway. It uses an example of freight interchange between the SPC and NPC as a need for such a facility. At the time the SPC freight ferry slip was at the south end of the original ferry building and the NPC was at the north end of the ferry building. Here is the pertinent text from the report:
"Three carloads of machinery were consigned to parties in San Francisco via the South Pacific Coast Railroad from Santa Cruz, distance eighty-five miles to the foot of Market Street. The freight charges were $55.50. The cost of transferring it to the North Pacific Coast Railroad, only one block away, was $55.50 also. The same cost for seven hundred feet in San Francisco as for eighty-five miles by railroad. This case is not the only one where the transfer across the city and from wharf to wharf has cost as much as the movement charges by rail for a distance of fifty to seventy-five miles.”

Dave, you mentioned that you have seen a photograph with the SPC ferry freight house in the distance. I have not seen this photo but would be very interested in seeing it.
User avatar
r3feetr
 
Posts: 104
Joined: Tue Sep 01, 2009 2:45 pm
Location: San Francisco Bay Area

Re: NPC/SPC cars in San Francisco -- 1875 - 1909

Postby Dave » Tue Oct 27, 2015 12:18 pm

John, yes, I have no argument against transshipment or the situation where raw materials came in on one line and the finished goods manufactured in SF went out on another line. I also have no proof of it happening simply because there are no waybills in existence I'm aware of. But transshipment is plausible while the actual interchange of cars between the railroads through SF is speculation. I posted this partially in the hope that someone will provide the evidence!

As to the photo, I am digging for it and not finding it at hand. But in my searching I looked through a bunch of other pictures of the Ferry Building area and it's possible to see where the SPC structure was, just not any cars sitting there. Let me share an article first and then what I see in a photographic chronology of that building form 1875 - 1896.

Here's the most solid evidence I have of what the SPC landing looked like in 1882-1890:
23 June 1880 Daily Alta CA page 1 col 3
THE HARBOR COMMISSIONERS.
Contracts Awarded for the Construction of a New Ferry-Slip and for Widening Broadway Wharf.
At the meeting of the Harbor Commissioners yesterday, bids were opened for the construction of the ferry-slips at the foot of Market-street wharf, to be used by the South Pacific Coast Railroad Company's steamers. There were six bids; that of the San Francisco Bridge Company, $35,355, being the lowest, they were awarded the contract. The slip will be used principally by the Garden City, and for her accommodation an apron 70 feet in length and 20 feet in width will be built at its upper end, with two lines of track, so that the narrow-gauge freight cars can all be run ashore at one time. [article continues but this is the most pertinent piece to the question--DE].

Now to the photographic evidence I have:
1) Late 1870s/maybe 1880 -- http://blogs.baruch.cuny.edu/his1000sum ... farry1.jpg. This is the 1875 building in its original form with 9 pointed-arch bays on the front of the building, above each a city name was ultimately inscribed though not visible in this particular photo. They were from left to right: Yuma, Portland, St. Louis, San Jose, Sacramento, Los Angeles, Chicago, New York, Boston.
2) Likely 1881 -- http://www.cliffhouseproject.com/photos ... iSF006.jpg. Note on the right end an additional 3 bay structure beyond the original Ferry Building but not connected to it as far as I can tell. This sits at/on the SPC freight terminal and the slip is (not visible) behind its left edge. Between the buildings are exit gates for the Oakland, and maybe Alameda, ferries.
3) In contrast is the 1886 photo from pacificng.org http://webbie1.sfpl.org/multimedia/sfph ... D-6246.jpg that appears to show the addition of bays all the way across to what likely is part of the SPC freight structure. Another 1886 picture, this one a panorama and shows the extension on the south end, with El Paso and San Antonio above two of the new bays. http://www.nickwright.com/SFHistory/SF_Panos_before.htm, scroll down the page to get to it.
4) But there are also three photos claimed to also be in 1886 where this addition is missing http://blog.sfgate.com/nolte/2013/07/07 ... s/#12776-1, https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Cate ... _the_1880s and http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/singl ... 54/rec/429
Note the Ferry Building now has 12 bays, 3 appear to have been added to the north end and the “Boston” bay at the south end is removed! SPC bill board on this side of the building. In some we see an Auction billboard on the front, in others it’s missing. So in the mid-1880s there were definite changes occurring to handle the increasing passenger ferry traffic. So I am guessing that what we’re seeing is the structure before/during/after a remodeling.
5) A couple years later comest this wonderful shot from 1889 showing the truncation of the building's south end also: http://foundsf.org/images/e/e0/Downtwn1 ... g-1889.jpg
6) And then this: http://www.streetcar.org/the_clangor_of ... and_going/ and in closeup, http://foundsf.org/images/8/8e/Varney-b ... -1880s.jpg. This view in about 1896 of the intersection of Market, Sacramento and East is one I just discovered today. This shows the 1875 Ferry Building in its last years during tear down and construction of the new (current) building. The added bays under the Pet Cigarettes sign are likely about where the SPC freight terminal had been from 1880-1891. In the center gap in the structure you can see a ferry slip hoist, perhaps the original SPC hoist reworked to handle passenger ferries?

Sketchy, cryptic and mysterious but there are hints to something being there. The changes bring the dating of some of the pictures into question. We just needed someone standing on East and Mission taking a shot looking eastward in 1883 to help solve this! I will keep looking for that elusive photo and post when/if I find it.

Dave Eggleston
Dave
 
Posts: 16
Joined: Thu May 02, 2013 9:10 am

Re: NPC/SPC cars in San Francisco -- 1875 - 1909

Postby r3feetr » Tue Oct 27, 2015 4:15 pm

Dave, It seems that our research has been taking parallel paths with regard to the San Francisco Ferry Terminal and the SPC. That photo you found today is an interesting shot; not one that I had seen before. I believe that the partially seen hoist is the hoist for the apron of the SPC freight boat. I have to disagree that the area under the Pet Cigarettes sign was the freight terminal. I believe it also included the area behind the General Arthur Cigars, Admiral Cigarettes and Chicago Clothing signs. My belief is base on the angle of the photo in regard to the hoist, the layout of the wharf prior to the construction of the temporary ferry building under the Pets Cigarettes sign, and the fact that the freight slip operated after the temporary ferry building was built. Have you seen the 1886 Sanborn maps for this area. It shows the layout of the SPC freight ferry slip. The freight slip apron and hoist houses just show on the right hand side:
1886Sanborn  SF Ferry Terminal.jpg

In April 1891 the temporary ferry building opened. The temporary building is the one under the Pet Cigarettes sign. The SPC freight slip continued in operation until December 1891 when the new Belt Line ferry slip was opened.

Regarding the photos that claim to be dated 1886. In February 1889 the SPC Passenger building and offices at the ferry building were relocated so that the Section 7 of the Seawall could be built. During time of construction the offices and ticket booth were moved both north and south to make room for the construction. Both the passenger boat and freight boat continued in operation from the usual slips. Access to the freight boat was accomplished by the construction of a temporary drawbridge across the construction. It must be just to the right in the three photos. Boy I would love to see a photograph of that bridge. The three photos you mentioned could not have been taken until sometime after February 1889. If you would like URLs to the newspaper articles reporting this information let me know, there are a number of them and it will take me some time to dig them up.
User avatar
r3feetr
 
Posts: 104
Joined: Tue Sep 01, 2009 2:45 pm
Location: San Francisco Bay Area

Re: NPC/SPC cars in San Francisco -- 1875 - 1909

Postby Dave » Tue Oct 27, 2015 5:23 pm

John, I won't refuse the offer! I'm a user of the Cal Digital Library if that's where you're reading, and if you have dates of Alta issues that works as well as URLs.

I'm very familiar with the 1886 Sanborns. Stumbling on them in 2007 is what triggered this project for me. It's been an interesting hunt. I need to learn more about the Ferry Building but limited time means I focus a lot on the Belt itself.

Dave Eggleston
Dave
 
Posts: 16
Joined: Thu May 02, 2013 9:10 am

Re: NPC/SPC cars in San Francisco -- 1875 - 1909

Postby r3feetr » Tue Oct 27, 2015 11:06 pm

Here is the list of newspaper articles I am aware of about the San Francisco Ferry Buildings and the State Belt Railroad. Most of them are available on the Cal Digital Newspaper collection website. The State Harbor Commission Annual Reports can be found on Google Books. Enjoy!

List format: Date, Newspaper, Page, Article Title

Ferry Building Articles


February 5, 1875 Daily Alta California, page 1 - Harbor Commissioners
February 19, 1875 Daily Alta California, page 1 - Harbor Commissioners
February 26, 1875 Daily Alta California, page 1 - Harbor Commissioners
March 5, 1875 Daily Alta California, page 1 - Harbor Commissioners
July 9, 1875 Daily Alta California, page 1 - Harbor Commissioners
September 3, 1875 Daily Alta California, page 4 - C.P.R.R.
May 15, 1877 Daily Alta California, page 1 - Along the Wharves
June 1, 1877 Daily Alta California, page 1 - Along the Wharves
July 21, 1877 Daily Alta California, page 1 - Harbor Commissioners
August 5, 1877 Daily Alta California, pages 2 and 1 - Notice to Builders
August 4, 1878 Daily Alta California, page 3 - NOTICE TO CARPENTERS AND BUILDERS.
October 31, 1878 Daily Alta California, page 1 - The Harbor Commissioners
November 12, 1878 Daily Alta California, page 2 - The Harbor Commissioners
May 16, 1879 Daily Alta California, page 1 - Harbor Commissioners.
November 19, 1879 Daily Alta California, page 2 - Harbor Commissioners
November 22, 1879 Daily Alta California, page 1 - Around The City
December 17, 1879 Daily Alta California, page 2 - Along the Wharves
February 25, 1880 Daily Alta California, page 2 - Harbor Work
October 1, 1880 Daily Alta California, page 1 - Harbor Commissioners
December 6, 1880 Biennial Report Board of State Harbor Commissioners, 1882 page 5 - State Harbor Commission Construction Account
December 7, 1880 Daily Alta California, page 2 - Harbor Commissioners
September 28, 1881 San Francisco Chronicle, page 4 - The Harbor Commission.
September 30, 1887 Daily Alta California, page 2 - Harbor Commissioners
June 10, 1888 Daily Alta California, page 2 - THE NEW SECTION OF SEAWALL.
November 2, 1888 Daily Alta California, page 1 - The Harbor Commission
November 9, 1888 Daily Alta California, page 2 - The Harbor Commission
December 15, 1888 Daily Alta California, pages 2 and 8 - The Harbor Commission
December 19, 1888 Daily Alta California, page 7 - The Harbor Commission
February 8, 1889 Daily Alta California, page 2 - Afloat and Ashore
February 10, 1889 Daily Alta California, page 1 - An Improved Waterfront
June 7, 1889 Daily Alta California, page 2 - Afloat and Ashore
July 20, 1889 Daily Alta California, page 2 - Afloat and Ashore
July 22, 1889 Daily Alta California, page 1 - Afloat and Ashore
July 26, 1889 Daily Alta California, page 2 - Afloat and Ashore.
August 21, 1889 Daily Alta California, page 2 - Afloat and Ashore
August 22, 1889 Daily Alta California, page 2 - Afloat and Ashore
September 20, 1889 Daily Alta California, page 2 - Afloat and Ashore
September 21, 1889 Daily Alta California, page 2 - Afloat and Ashore
September 22, 1889 Daily Alta California, page 2 - Afloat and Ashore
September 24, 1889 Daily Alta California, page 2 - A Sad Accident.
September 30, 1889 Daily Alta California, page 2 - Afloat and Ashore
October 2, 1889 Daily Alta California, page 2 - Afloat and Ashore
October 9, 1889 Daily Alta California, page 2 - Afloat and Ashore
October 17, 1889 Daily Alta California, page 1 - That Coffer-Dam.
October 30, 1889 Daily Alta California, page 2 - Afloat and Ashore
November 15, 1889 Daily Alta California, page 7 - Afloat and Ashore
January 7, 1890 Daily Alta California, page 2 - That Concrete Wall
January 10, 1890 Daily Alta California, page 2 - City Front Notes
May 18, 1890 San Francisco Call, page 3 - Items from Sea and Shore
June 11, 1890 Daily Alta California, page 2 - NEW FERRY DEPOT
June 11, 1890 San Francisco Chronicle, page 3 - HARBOR COMMISSIONERS.
July 19, 1890 San Francisco Call, page 6 - Sea and Shore.
December 19, 1890 Daily Alta California, page 2 - The Temporary Ferry Depot
March 24, 1891 San Francisco Call, page 6 - Sea and Shore
March 28, 1891 San Francisco Call, page 3 - THE FERRY-SLIPS.
April 8, 1891 San Francisco Call, page 3 - Sea and Shore
April 28, 1891 Daily Alta California, page 6 - The Temporary Ferry House
May 13, 1891 San Francisco Call, page 3 - Harbor Front
June 30, 1891 San Francisco Call, page 7 - To Prevent Confusion
February 3, 1893 Railroad Gazette, page 89 - New Ferry House at San Francisco.
June 4, 1898 San Francisco Call, page 5 - The Passing of the Grady
July 12, 1898 San Francisco Call, page 12 - A RAILROAD BARRICADE TORN DOWN
July 14, 1898 San Francisco Call, page 12 - NEW FERRY DEPOT OPENED




State Belt Articles

October 10, 1888 Daily Alta California, page 2 - A UNION FREIGHT LANDING
October 17, 1888 Daily Alta California, page 8 - MORE RAILROAD FACILITIES
October 25, 1888 Daily Alta California, page 2 - The Water-Front Belt Line
December 22, 1888 Daily Alta California, page 2 - The Harbor Commission
April 16, 1889 Daily Alta California, page 1 and 8 - Harbor Management
May 22, 1890 San Francisco Call, page 2 - BELT LINE AND FERRY.
May 23, 1890 Daily Alta California, page 2 - Afloat and Alongshore
July 8, 1890 San Francisco Call, page 2 - Harbor Commissioners
November 30, 1890 Daily Alta California, page 5 - Afloat and Ashore
April 10, 1891 Daily Alta California, page 2 - Belt Railroad Work
June 9, 1891 San Francisco Call, page 2 - THE BELT RAILROAD.
October 22, 1891 San Francisco Call, page 6 - NEW BELT LINE.
December 6, 1891 San Francisco Call, page 3 - Items from Sea and Shore.
December 19, 1891 Pacific Rural Press, pages 517-518 - The Water Front of San Francisco.
June 30, 1892 Biennial Report of the State Harbor Commission, page 19-20 - THE BELT RAILROAD.
October 12, 1892 San Francisco Call, page 7 - THE BELT RAILROAD LINE.
October 19, 1892 San Francisco Call, page 6 - HARBOR COMMISSIONERS.
March 2, 1894 San Francisco Call, page 3 - A RAILROAD PLUM.
User avatar
r3feetr
 
Posts: 104
Joined: Tue Sep 01, 2009 2:45 pm
Location: San Francisco Bay Area

Re: NPC/SPC cars in San Francisco -- 1875 - 1909

Postby Dave » Wed Oct 28, 2015 10:36 am

John, that's a great list and having it is a great resource for everyone interested in the SF rail operations. Thanks!

I have all of the Commission reports available for the period in question. The detail expense accountings can be really enlightening if tedious to work through!

Here are a few more articles you may know but I'll add them for those interested:

Feb 2 1875 Daily Alta California -- Along the Wharves
Jun 23 1880 Daily Alta California – The Harbor Commissioners
Dec 17 1880 Daily Alta California – San Francisco Items
March 9 1884 Daily Alta California – Postponed for a Week
Nov 1 1886 Daily Alta California – The City. [regarding a new SPC ferry]
Nov 24 1886 Daily Alta California – Shipyard Notes
Jan 5 1888 Daily Alta California – They Wish the Law Changed
Aug 24 1888 Daily Alta California – The Harbor Commissioners
Sept 5 1888 Daily Alta California – The Harbor Commission
Sept 16 1888 Daily Alta California – Afloat and Ashore
Nov 24 1888 Daily Alta California – Seawall Lots
Dec 1 1888 Daily Alta California – The Harbor Commission
Dec 5 1888 Daily Alta California – The Harbor Commission
March 3 1889 Daily Alta California – City Front Railway
Dec 4 1889 Daily Alta California – Harbor Commissioners.
May 22 1890 Daily Alta California – Afloat and Ashore
June 12 1890 Sacramento Daily Union – Proposed Improvements to the City Front in San Fancisco
July 17 1890 Daily Alta California – Seawall Belt Railroad
July 29 1890 San Francisco Call – Sea and Shore
Aug 14 1890 San Francisco Call – Sea and Shore
Aug 29 1890 San Francisco Call – Harbor Commissioners
Sept 11 1890 San Francisco Call – Sea and Shore
Nov 18 1890 Daily Alta California – Changes to Termini of Car Lines

Starting in 1890 and running though 1891 the number of articles on the Belt's construction and initial operations increases dramatically, all easily discovered in the Alta and SF Call online. With the 1892 construction there's another short flurry and then reporting goes pretty quiet from what I've seen.

Dave Eggleston
Dave
 
Posts: 16
Joined: Thu May 02, 2013 9:10 am


Return to Western Narrow Gauge Discussion

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest

cron