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Nevada Central Book Pre-Order

Nevada Central Book Pre-Order

Postby Andrew Brandon » Fri Sep 24, 2010 10:15 am

Just wanted to give a heads up that Farrell's Nevada Central book is now available for order on Heimburger House's website: Link.
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Re: Nevada Central Book Pre-Order

Postby John Coker » Sat Sep 25, 2010 7:25 am

I saw the book at the N.G. Convention. It looked very good, with many photos I never saw. Photo reproduction is vastly improved from ptrevious Heimburger books. I have a couple of images Mallory either didn't have or use. It will be nicely-presented source material on a one of the Old West's most obscure abd antiquated roads.
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Re: Nevada Central Book Pre-Order

Postby Andrew Brandon » Wed Oct 06, 2010 5:33 pm

A quick note: My copy of the book arrived today, apparently the note about coming in November is not accurate.
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Re: Nevada Central Book Pre-Order

Postby John Coker » Wed Oct 20, 2010 5:51 pm

I received my comp copy from Mal Ferrell today. A very nice book, considering its obscurity. If you wanted to go way offbeat, it would be fun to model, especially the Austin City Railway. In the last decade of operation they ran only 30 steam trains a yar. However, they had an interesting little rosters of railbuses. The cover is excellent ;)
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Re: Nevada Central Book Pre-Order

Postby Andrew Brandon » Mon Oct 25, 2010 10:07 am

I was pleased to see my book arrived as promptly as it did. That evening I managed to read the whole book cover to cover and was quite impressed (with the cover too!). Among the images that caught my attention were the great shots along the line and the inclusion of the Stockton and Ione, and first Nevada Central albeit briefly, additionally the Cortez Mines RR, Battle Mountain and Lewis, and the Austin City were a treat.

I can't wait to see his Lake Tahoe book.
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Re: Nevada Central Book Pre-Order

Postby John Coker » Mon Oct 25, 2010 10:39 am

Mal's coverage of the BM&L and AC Rys give many model ideas. He also has a lot on therir motley fleet of motor cars. Some of them had interesting histories. One harrowing tale of an operator nearly freezong to death when the motorcar bogged down in a drift. According to Ferrell the NC rain only 30 steam trains a year the last decade of operation. What a poor road!
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Re: Nevada Central Book Pre-Order

Postby Andrew Brandon » Mon Oct 25, 2010 10:50 am

I've been reading the Reese River Reveille when I get the chance and I've got a few additional notes that Farrell didn't get in the book.

These are all from the Reese River Reveille, 1887.

Jan 18th.

A new step.
The traveling public, especially the ladies, will be grateful to learn that the railroad is having the steps on all its passenger coaches made lower by the addition of one more, so that there will be less effort necessary in boarding or alighting a car.

Jan 21st

L. J. Hanchett came from Battle Mountain up the small engine called the Go Devil. They left Battle Mountain about 11 o'clock yesterday morning, and after being on the way a short distance the engine did not work well; so that they had much work in making any headway. It took them about 12 hours to make the trip getting to Clifton about 10 o'clock last night. The pump refused to work several times so that they had to stop and fix it. Hastings was the engineer. It was a very disagreeable trip for all parties.

Jan 24

Communicated.
[Special Correspondence.]
Battle Mountain. Jan 22.

Editor Reveille:- Items have become so scarce here that there is nothing to write about, except what is left of our once flourishing town. It can boast now of only about 100 white inhabitants, 15 Chinamen and several Indian wickiups. It is true that there are two railroad depots, the Nevada Central machine shops, four or five feed and livery stables, four or five hotels, several lodging places, two blacksmith shops, three variety stores, a butcher shop, grocery store or two, six saloons; but to given living support all of these, requires a greater population and better surroundings than here exist.
The important problem to be solved by those in business is: "How can I manage to get income(?) to meet expenses?"
When will Battle Mountain see better days? is the question with the anxious hangers on in your sister town. It is believed that Battle Mountain has a better future. There are good mines in Lewis, in Galena and Battle Mountain districts that will, it is being believed, contribute to its support at no great distant day.
The reports of the sale of the Manhattan and Curtis properties, and the hope that something will be done at Ledlie and Yankee Blade, give to us some encouragement of better times.
We of Battle Mountain, in the hope of success to Lander, congratulate the people of Austin in their future prospects.
Veritas.

Feb 3rd

Motor House Fire.

About 15 minutes to 4 o'clock this morning Thomas Karney discovered the fire at the motor house, at that time the roof was ablaze but had not gained much headway. He immediately gave the alarm by ringing the bell at the Manhattan Hose house. By this time James and John Nagle, living close by, were awakened and rushed to the fire. The door was shut and it took some time to batter it down. A. E. Johnson, W. E. Jackson and John Malloy arriving they set to work to pull out the motor. The flames were consuming the framework or cab, and the smoke being dense and stifling, it prevented the men from working to any advantage. But the hose belonging to the motor house was found and water turned on. The fire was quench slightly at the end of the motor next to them so they could see what they could do. Jackson entered the cab having a stream of water thrown upon him and threw off the break. The flames were all around him. He also had to crawl underneath to take out a block which was before the wheel. There were six persons altogether who tried to pull the engine out by catching hold of the cow catcher. Frank Dixon and others arrived, and some one bringing a wench rope they tied it to the cow catcher and pulled her out, the fire burning fiercely. Frank Dixon stood by the break and stopped her about 40 feet from the house. Shortly before this the boys had got the Manhattan hose cart just below the shop and the hose was stretch from the hydrant across the ditch to the fire, and as soon as the nozzle was secured the water was turned on. As the motor came out the boys directed the nozzle upon her, putting the fire out in a short time after which the whole attention of the fireman was turned to save the motor house. The fire had consumed the roof but the strong force of the stream soon began to show its effect by checking the fire. In about an hour's time the fire was over. The roof of the building was burned, leave only a shell, but the walls being adobe were not damaged in the least. The cab of the motor was badly damaged, the windows melting but there was no damage to the machinery or the motor proper, with the exception of the woodwork. The Eagle Hose Company came promptly with their hose cart, but there being only one hydrant they did not use their hose. Luckily there was no wind otherwise the Boston mill and the hoisting works of the Samson mine would have been in danger of catching fire. Those holding the nozzle had their hands benumbed with cold and their close wet. Chief Engineer J. E. Farrell directed the firemen in their work. This is the second time the motor has been burned. The flames lighted brightly the surrounding neighborhood, and there must have been fifty men altogether congregated, coming from every quarter of Austin. Almost every member of the Manhattan Hose Company was ready for duty. It is supposed the fire originated by a spark from the smoke stack.

Feb 14th.

The motor is out for the first time since the fire. The cab shows plainly the ravages of the fire.

The new roof on the motor house is almost completed.

Feb 16th.

The blockade on the Austin City Railroad could not be broken this morning. The snow plow forged its way through the drifts, but the motor could not haul the car of wood up the steep grade. It left the flat car and steamed up the track but stalled in front of the Post office. It is not known when communication on the railroad can be had between Austin and the City of Clifton.

--
When I ever get the newspaper database going I'll have all of these and many more articles searchable by road on the site.
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