C&C passenger cars...

North American Narrow Gauge; West of the Rockies (including Canada; Mexico).
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Randy Hees
Posts: 464
Joined: Mon Aug 17, 2009 7:07 pm

C&C passenger cars...

Post by Randy Hees » Sun Jul 21, 2019 3:06 pm

The following is an attempt to distill C&C passenger car histories, separate from the pollution with is SPng history... for eventual posting on the C&C railroad history page on this site...


Carson & Colorado Passenger Equipment, 1881-1900
(including cabooses, officer’s cars and express box cars)


A disclaimer.... This is a roster of the Passenger Cars of the Carson & Colorado railroad, as owned by D. O. Mills and controlled by the Virginia & Truckee railroad, before the line’s purchase by the Southern Pacific in 1901. Rosters of cars operated on the later line (as either named the Carson & Colorado, the Nevada & California or the Southern Pacific narrow gauge) under Southern Pacific ownership will be discussed in a second roster.

The railroad had a total of 10 passenger cars, plus 3 or 4 boxcars modified and painted for use in express service. Cars were rebuilt and remodeled during their service lives, and their use changed over time.

A typical C&C passenger train had (first class) coach seating, a smoking section, space for baggage, for express shipments (with an express messenger) and eventually for mail. At one point some trains had second class seating in the smoking compartment.

To accommodate those functions, a typical train (until 1899) was three cars, 1) an express box car, 2) a combination baggage/mail car, with a passenger/smoking compartment, and 3) a coach

In 1899, the combination cars were rebuilt, removing the smoking compartment, as a baggage/mail/express car, and the coaches were partitioned into two compartments, one for 1st class passengers, the second as a smoking section. The express box cars were returned to service as freight cars.

Smoker, Baggage, Mail, Express Cars (“Combination Car” as built)

These cars were all built by Barney & Smith. As built these three cars 40’0” long, with three compartments for passenger (smoking), baggage, and express.

No 3 Built by Barney & Smith, received February 1881 with smoker, express and baggage compartments. Changed to smoker, RPO, baggage, September 1883. Rebuilt June-September 1899, removing smoking compartment and windows, making the car a baggage, mail, express car in two compartments.

Sold to Southern Pacific 1900. Received rail reinforced ends per Post Office practice at unknown date. Changed to single compartment baggage car by 1920. Retired August 1939, and sold to Parker Lyon for his Lyon Pony Express Museum, Arcadia CA. Presented there as under various railroad names and numbers. To William F Harra, to Nevada State Railroad Museum, Carson City

No 4 Built by Barney & Smith, received February 1881 with smoker, express and baggage compartments. Changed to smoker, RPO, baggage, September 1883. Rebuilt March-December 1900, removing smoking compartment and windows, making the car a baggage, mail, express car in two compartments.

Sold to Southern Pacific 1900. Received rail reinforced ends per Post Office practice at unknown date. Changed to single compartment baggage car by October 1926. Vacated June 1938. Detrucked February 1939, body used as tool house at Keeler CA. Body sold 1960, relocated in Keeler CA

No 6 Built by Barney & Smith, received September 1881 with smoker, express and baggage compartments. Changed to smoker, RPO, baggage, September 1883. Rebuilt October/December 1900, removing smoking compartment and windows, making the car a baggage, mail, express car in two compartments.

Sold to Southern Pacific 1900. Received rail reinforced ends per Post Office practice at unknown date. Changed to single compartment baggage car by August 1928. Retired June 12 1934, sold to Nevada County Narrow Gauge Railroad for $150. Re-lettered NCNG No 9 by SP Shops. Retired May 1937, Burned (scrapped) October 1938

Note: Caboose 1 was rebuilt and used as a RPO/baggage express for a short time c.1899

Express Box Cars

These cars were built as part of a 30 car order (only 26 ever assembled) for 25’ long La Mothe “gas pipe” patent box cars. The La Mothe cars were built from common iron pipe, with sheet metal sheathing. The rode on Theilsen arch bar trucks. Three (or four) of these box cars were rebuilt with clearstory and used express cars in passenger trains. As such they were repainted and lettered “Wells Fargo & Company Fast Freight”

No 300 Received January 1881, presumably the only assembled car received. Converted
mid-1881 for Wells Fargo Express service with an approximately 8’ long
clearstory. Converted to back to a conventional box car mid-1899. To Southern Pacific March 1900, Broken up at Mina, 8/1906

No 301 Received January 1881 as kit. Converted by mid-1881 for Wells Fargo Express
service with an approximately 8’ long clearstory. Converted to back to a
conventional box car mid-1899. To Southern Pacific March 1900, Broken up at
Mina, 10/1908

No 302 Received January 1881 as kit. Converted by mid-1881 for Wells Fargo Express
service with an approximately 8’ long clearstory. Converted to back to a
conventional box car mid-1899. To Southern Pacific March 1900, Broken up at
Mina, 9/1907

No 303 Received January 1881 as kit. Believed to have been used for Wells Fargo
Express service. Existing body shows no evidence of a clearstory. If in express service, it was converted to back to a conventional box car by 1899. To Southern Pacific March 1900, Broken up at Mina, 8/1906. Body used as residence and shed. Body to NSRM-Carson City 1983


Coaches

The three cars were all built by Barney & Smith Manufacturing Co. As built these three cars were identical. They were 40’6” long, with seating for 50.

No 1 Built by Barney & Smith received February 1881. Rebuilt November/December 1899
Adding a partition to make a 12’ smoking section.

Sold to Southern Pacific 1900. Converted to Passenger/Baggage seating 32 by SP Sparks shops, renumbered SP No 7 October 1931. Changed to MW caboose, No 17 (2nd). Burned at Owenyo, July 4, 1943. Broken up at Owenyo, November 1943

No 2 Built by Barney & Smith received February 1881. Rebuilt June/September 1899
Adding a partition to make a 14’4” smoking section.

Sold to Southern Pacific 1900. Retired June 11 1934, sold to Nevada County Narrow Gauge Railroad for $150. Re-lettered NCNG No 8 by SP Shops. Retired May 1936, Burned (scrapped) October 1938

No 5 Built by Barney & Smith received October 1881. Rebuilt December 1899/ January 1900
Adding a partition to make a 14’2” smoking section.

Sold to Southern Pacific 1900. Trucks replaced with St Charles Car Co trucks, 1929. Retired March 1938 and sold to Ward Kimball. To Orange Empire Railroad Museum.

Cabooses

Defined as cars used on freight trains, with passenger accommodations. Note that initially cabooses had their own number series, including the car constructed as No 3, which became caboose No 7 numbered with passenger cars when it entered service.

No. 1 Built by the V&T Carson City Shops, 1882 with trucks purchased from Barney &
Smith (received 3/1882). As built this car had a 36’ body had an arched roof, cupola,
and 4 windows & a baggage door each side. This car was initially used on the Hawthorne to Candelaria freight train. It was listed as a “freight caboose” in 1896. Later (1899?) rebuilt with a short ventilator clearstory and used as spare RPO. It was considered a caboose at the time of the railroad’s sale to SP.

The car was included in the railroad’s sale to the Southern Pacific in 1900. It was re-lettereed “N&C No 1” in March 1907. The car was detrucked in January 1908 at Mina for use as a railroad owned residence. The body was acquired by Richard Dayton in 1969 and transferred to the Bishop Museum and Historical Society at Laws CA.

No 2 Built by the V&T Carson City Shops, 1882 with trucks purchased from Barney &
Smith (received 3/1882). As built this car had a 36’ body an arched roof, cupola, and 4
windows & a baggage door each side. The trucks were purchased from Barney & Smith (received March 1882)

This car became the officer’s car and was soon rebuilt with a passenger-style clearstory
on the long end. See “Official Cars” (below) for later history

No 3/No 7, Built by the V&T Carson City shops using Barney & Smith trucks (received 12/1882) as caboose No 3, but entering service 9/1883 as Caboose Coach No 7. As built the car had a duck bill roof, 9 windows and a baggage door on each side. The car was built for use on the Candilaria to Bellville train. The car was nearly destroyed by fire at Dayton NV in late 1886, but was rebuilt. The car was last repainted by the V&T in August 1896, at which time it was referred to as a “freight caboose”

The car was included in the railroad’s sale to the Southern Pacific in 1900. It was changed to MW Derrick Tender, No 7 in July 1905. It was declared “worn out” in 11/1905 at Laws

Official Cars

No 2 Built by the V&T Carson City Shops, 1882 as a caboose, with trucks purchased from Barney & Smith (received 3/1882). As built this car had an arched roof, cupola, and 4 windows & a baggage door each side. The trucks were purchased from Barney & Smith (received March 1882)

This car became the officer’s car and was rebuilt as a “superintendent’s car in June 1883 with a passenger-style clearstory on the long end.

The car was sold to the Inyo Development Company in 1900, (managed by H. M. Yerrington), being repainted as Inyo Development No 2 by the V&T shops in March 1900, assigned to Inyo Development superintendent R. J. Laws. In 1903 the was used by the C&C/SP in a two car special inspection train (with Car 10, below). The car was sold to the Tonopah Railroad (No 2, later No 5) in September 1904.

Note: this car was never owned by the Southern Pacific Railroad

The car as No 5 was mounted on standard gauge freight trucks by the TRR in August 190 after that railroad was converted to standard gauge. The car was de-trucked, with the body used as a depot at Millers Nevada. The car body was acquired by Dick Dayton in the mid-1960’s and moved to the Bishop Museum and Historical Society at Laws CA. It was later sold to sold to private interests and is now restored as C&C No 2 in a private collection in San Diego County.

No 10 Built by the V&T Carson Shops over the winter of 1895/96, entering service in May 1896 as a 44’ long car, with cupola and clearstory on the long end. It had 5 windows on one side (on the long end) with 6 windows on the other, for use by V&T President and General Manager Henry Yerington. As such it was painted yellow with olive letterboard and corner posts.

Sold to the Southern Pacific in 1900. Rebuilt between March and May 1903 by Southern Pacific, Sacramento Shops as Business Car Esmerelda, No 10, now with cupola removed and full clearstory roof, seven windows on one side, 8 on the opposite, end platform lengthened by 14”. The car was declared “worn out” in March 1930, de-trucked and placed at Keeler CA as crew sleeping quarters. The body was sold in 1960, resold several times before being donated to the Orange Empire Railroad Museum in 1990.






Draft, 7.21.2019, By Randy Hees, comments to randyhees@gmail.com
Randy Hees

Director, Nevada State Railroad Museum, Boulder City
Railway Preservation News http://www.rypn.org
Chasing old trains where ever I may find them...
http://randyhees.blogspot.com/

Brian Norden
Posts: 292
Joined: Thu Sep 03, 2009 11:40 pm

Re: C&C passenger cars...

Post by Brian Norden » Mon Jul 22, 2019 1:15 pm

Randy,

A few thoughts and revisions.

Ownership and control of the Carson & Colorado.

D.O. Mills did not own the C&C; he had a controlling investment. D.O. Mills only owned 43.7% of the stock in the C&C Railroad and each of the previous C&C Ry, Second Division C&C Ry and Third Division C&C Ry. William Sharon and his estate (later held in the name of Sharon’s son-in-law Francis Newlands) was the second largest holder at 26.25%. Edgar Mills held 7.50% of the stock; after his death in 1893 this was in trust for his daughters and administered by his brother D.O. Mills and D.O. Mills’ son, Ogden Mills. So, after 1893 D.O. Mills had beneficial control of 51.2% of the stock.

Stockholder meetings and board meeting were held in San Francisco and it appears that Mills seldom if ever attended these; his shares being represented by proxy.

The appearance of control by the V&T comes from the shared resources. The management of the C&C held similar positions with the V&T and operated out of the same physical office.

Although H. M. Yerrington was President of the C&C, he was unaware of D.O. Mills negotiations to sell the stock and bonds of the C&C to the Southern Pacific. He may have supposed that something was happening as he had to provide Mr. Mills in 1899 with a list of stock and bond holders in the company.

H. M. Yerrington in writing to D.O. Mills generally kept the various enterprises separate. Because of the existing shop in Carson City the V&T provided initial construction and ongoing maintenance services to the C&C.

The change of stock ownership to the Southern Pacific occurred in 1900 with an effective date of March 1, 1900. It appears that Mills had to explain to Yerrington that there was no new company; but, that the SP now owned the stock and would control the company. The SP controlled C&C continued to employee several people in the Carson City office including of of HMY's sons.

Number of train sets.

Yerrington reported to Mills that when the Board of Directors voted to continue the construction into California they spoke of the need of additional equipment. This included passenger train sets. But none of this was acquired except for maybe an already pending order of two locomotives.

When the service into the Owens Valley was added, it was done on a tri-weekly basis. Since this was not the Post Office required service the USPO made a deduction in the payments. Later the entire railroad operated on a tri-weekly schedule.

Car histories

All cars remained in the ownership of the Carson & Colorado until all the physical property was sold to Nevada & California Railway, an SP subsidiary in 1905. The C&C received stock in the N&C for the railroad and equipment. Subsequently the stock was transferred to the SP as a dividend and the C&C was allowed to go out of existence.

The baggage-mail cars received the end reinforcing as follows (information from the record cards):
Car #3 received 35-pound rails at Sparks out of shop 10-28-15.
Car #4 received 65-pound rails at Sparks out of shop 7-19-17.
Car #6 received 65-pound rails at Sparks out of shop 8-2-16

After the end of mail service on the line the following changes occurred:
Car #3 converted to baggage car at Sparks out of shop 6-18-29
Car #4 converted to baggage car at Sparks out of shop 8-31-28
Car #6 all mail fixtures removed at Mina 11-22-29

Coach 1, later SP combination bag-coach #7, was renumbered to caboose (not MW caboose) #17 10-14-40.

The cars sold to the Nevada County Narrow Gauge may or may not have been renumbered by the Southern Pacific. Cars were sold 6-12-34. The additional renumbering comes as an advice from “ATM” as of 8-15-34. This I believe is A. (Armand) T. Mercier who was then SP General Manager (1933-1938) and was to become SP Vice-President (1938-41) and then (President (1941-51). Perhaps he had visited the NCNG and made note of the renumberings and so advised the car record staff.

Coach #5 is listed on its record card as being sold 3-28-38 to G. M. Best for $200 plus tax. Gerald Best who was a friend of Ward Kimball and may have been acting as his agent or go-between in this matter. It is interesting that the roster prepared by Fred A. Stindt and Gerald M. Best from Sp records for John Hungerford's The Slim Princess 1961 booklet says that G.M. Best bought it for the "Grizzly Flats R.R." with no mention of Ward Kimball.
Brian Norden

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